Kentucky Injury Lawyers

Benzene Exposure Can be Dangerous

Published on May 19, 2014 at 8:35 am in Work Injury.

How dangerous is Benzene?Benzene is a chemical that occurs naturally and is also used in manufacturing processes. It occurs naturally in forest fires, crude oil, gasoline, and cigarette smoke. Industrial uses for benzene include plastics, resins, and synthetic fibers.

Studies on benzene exposure

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has declared that benzene causes cancer in humans. Long-term exposure (defined as exposure for one year or more) can cause leukemia, which is a cancer of the blood-forming organs. Studies have shown that workers exposed to high levels of benzene have higher rates of leukemia, and especially acute myeloid leukemia. Studies have also shown a connection between benzene exposure and acute lymphocytic leukemia in children, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, apalstic anemia, and other blood-related cancers.

Asbestos Suits in Hollywood

Published on May 16, 2014 at 8:33 am in Work Injury.

When you think of asbestos suits, usually industrial types of materials come to mind. Lawsuits have been filed in the construction industries, as well as oil and gas. Asbestos is often found in building insulation. Now, the family of Ed Lauter, a popular character actor familiar to many television viewers, has brought suit claiming exposure to asbestos caused him to die from mesothelioma in May 2013 at age 74.

Mesothelioma is a rare and fatal cancer that is linked to asbestos exposure and the inhalation of asbestos fibers. In a lawsuit filed against CBS, NBC and General Electric, a prior owner of NBC, Lauter’s family claims that he was exposed to asbestos, in part, after decades of work inside TV studios. Over many decades, Lauter had roles in TV shows ranging from Mannix and Kojak to Law & Order, the X-Files and Grey’s Anatomy. His movie roles include playing the role of Captain Knauer in The Longest Yard with Burt Reynolds. He also recently played the part of Peppy’s butler in the Oscar-winning movie The Artist.

Recognizing and Preventing Work-Related Heat Illness

Published on Jun 10, 2013 at 8:00 am in Work Injury.

As the Kentucky summer heats up, many experienced Kentucky injury attorneys will begin to see more clients who have suffered injury or illness after being exposed to excessive heat while on the job. Workers who labor outdoors are at particular risk, as are those who wear bulky protective clothing or equipment, and workers who have not yet built up a tolerance to the heat.

Heat-related illnesses occur when the body is unable to reduce its own core temperature sufficiently. Excessive heat can cause heat-related illness or injury, and so can a lack of water or a problem with the body’s ability to produce perspiration to cool itself.

NAOSH Week Shines Spotlight on Preventing Workplace Injuries

Published on May 8, 2013 at 8:00 am in Work Injury.

The American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), the Canadian Society of Safety Engineering (CSSE), and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) have teamed up to make the first week in May North American Occupational Safety and Health Week (NAOSH Week), highlighting the need for workplace safety and health measures to protect workers and maintain company productivity.

In 2011, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), 4,609 people lost their lives in U.S. workplace accidents – an average of about 13 deaths each day nationwide.  Another 3 million people suffered injuries and illnesses, at a rate of about 3.5 injuries per 100 full-time workers.  These rates held steady from the previous year, marking the first two-year span in which injury and death rates in the workplace had not decreased since 2002.

New Data Shows Increase in Fatal Work Injuries for 2010

Published on May 14, 2012 at 8:21 am in Work Injury.

New statistics released by the U.S. Department of Labor reveals an increase in job-related fatalities, according to a GalesburgPlanet.com news report. The Department of Labor report shows that 4,690 workers in the U.S. suffered fatal injuries in 2010, which is a three percent increase from 2009. The increase does, in part, reflect the high profile disasters in 2010, including the BP Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico in which 11 people lost their lives, a West Virginia coal mine explosion that killed 29, and a Tesoro Corp. oil refinery blast in Washington that killed seven.

The data also reveals some startling trends regarding fatal workplace injuries. According to the report, the number of workers killed in fires or explosions rose from 113 in 2009 to 191 in 2010. In addition, work-related transportation deaths increased from 1,795 to 1,857. However, construction-related deaths fell from 834 to 774, which can likely be attributed to the weak housing market in 2010 and ailing economy.

  • Page 1 of 2
  • 1
  • 2