Kentucky Injury Lawyers

Most Common Car Defects in 2018

Published on Sep 18, 2018 at 12:46 pm in Auto Product Liability.

When you can’t depend on your car, your ability to travel is hindered. You may be taking risks every time you drive your vehicle. If your car has a safety-related defect, you shouldn’t be driving it until the defect is fixed. This could include issues with the car’s wiring, faulty tires, accelerators—anything that would make your car a danger to everyone’s safety on the road.

Defective cars can cause devastating car accidents. If you’ve been injured in a car accident, you don’t have to go through it alone. Get in touch with a Cincinatti car accident lawyer from Thomas Law Offices for a free consultation.

Old Church Vans Still Placing Lives at Risk

Published on May 15, 2018 at 12:15 pm in Auto Product Liability.

Transportation safety officials at organizations like the NHTSA have known since 2001 that 15-passenger vans are prone to roll over in a crash when loaded with passengers. Officials have delivered safety warnings to carmakers as well as the public. Still, there are many churches and organizations all over Kentucky, in Louisville, and nationwide that depend on these vans and use them on a daily basis to transport passengers—often including children—to where they need to be.

According to a recent investigation launched by Courier Journal, 600 people have been killed in single-vehicle rollovers involving 15-passenger vans since the safety warnings were issued 17 years ago. The most common vans in these accidents are made by Ford, Chrysler, and GM. The 2002 Ford E350 is one of the most well-known accident-causing culprits.

Defective Takata Airbag Named Responsible for Death

Published on Nov 8, 2016 at 11:00 am in Auto Product Liability.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration concluded on Thursday, October 20th that a recent car crash in Riverside County, California was fatal due to yet another defective airbag deployment.  Takata airbags, the Japanese brand of airbag installed in nearly every major brand of vehicle on the road, has been named the cause of death in now 11 car crashes on U.S. roadways and responsible for more than 100 injuries. 

Instead of softening the impact of a crash, the airbags have been known to explode and deploy metal shrapnel into the bodies of persons inside the vehicle.  First responders arriving on scene of a crash have reported the bodies of passengers appearing to have been shot or stabbed.

NHTSA Investigates a Fatal Crash Involving a Vehicle Driving Itself on Autopilot

Published on Jul 14, 2016 at 2:52 pm in Auto Accident, Auto Product Liability.

A fatal accident occurring in Williston, Florida on May 7 is now under investigation by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Joshua Brown, a 40-year-old man from Canton, Ohio, died when his Tesla Model S electric sedan crashed into the side of a tractor-trailer. The car was in self-driving mode and failed to apply the brakes when the tractor-trailer made a left turn in front of the vehicle. Federal regulators, who are in the early stages of setting guidelines for autonomous vehicles, have opened a formal investigation into the incident. This is the first known fatal accident involving a vehicle controlling itself by means of computer software, sensors, cameras, and radar.

Volkswagen Emissions Scandal Gains International Momentum After U.S. Announces Massive Settlement

Published on Jul 13, 2016 at 4:12 pm in Auto Product Liability.

This past Tuesday, the U.S. Government announced a $14.7 billion settlement with the automobile manufacturer, Volkswagen, settling claims that the company used illegal devices to defeat and inaccurately pass diesel engine emissions tests. The settlement is the largest automobile settlement ever in U.S. history, and is drawing international attention. Countries all over the world are now taking action against Volkswagen, demanding compensation and justice for buyer around the globe.

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