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The Dangerous Side Effects of Propoxyphene

Published on Feb 11, 2011 at 11:00 am in Dangerous Drugs.

Propoxyphene was first approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1957 as a pain reliever, and has since been used by about 10 million patients. However, the drug was recently pulled off the market, according to MedScape.com.

Five years ago, the drug was banned in the United Kingdom because it posed a risk to patients of suicide. In 2009, it was taken off the market in Europe because of worries about overdoses. Any Kentucky Darvocet side effect attorney would want the public to know that Darvocet has now been taken off the market in the U.S. because of concern over arrhythmias.

Union County Head-On Car Collision Kills One, Injures Three

Published on Feb 8, 2011 at 6:11 pm in Auto Accident.

An accident in Union County, Kentucky killed one teen and injured three on February 6, according to WFIE. The wreck occurred near Uniontown on Highway 360. It took almost three hours for first responders to clear the scene.

The wreck occurred when a pickup truck crossed over the center lane and struck a car driven by an 18-year-old male. Both the truck driver and a passenger in the truck were not wearing their seat belts, which caused them to be ejected from the vehicle. They were transported by helicopter to a local hospital where they were listed in critical condition following the fatal Kentucky car accident.

Safe Winter Driving Checklist and Tips for Kentucky Motorists

Published on Feb 3, 2011 at 8:06 am in Auto Accident.

While it is easy to get caught up in a hurry or procrastinate having your vehicle serviced, it is very important for motorists to ensure their vehicle is in optimal condition no matter what season it is. However, during the winter months when rain and snow can strike at varying degrees, the condition of your vehicle is just as important as certain points you may want to check before hitting the road.

Safecar.gov, run by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), reminds motorists to do the following:

Kentucky Senate Bill 72 Calls for Hospital-Acquired Infections State Reports

Published on Jan 31, 2011 at 8:59 am in Medical Malpractice.

Is it possible that almost one in 20 patients acquire an infection while staying at a hospital? While this may seem shocking, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently made this estimation about hospital-acquired infections.

Most Kentuckians are probably aware of Senate Bill 72, which would make it a requirement for Kentucky hospitals to report all infections as well as put infection prevention programs into practice for areas such as surgical and intensive care units. The legislature is expected to reconvene on February 1.

Jefferson Circuit Court Judge Finds Louisville Doctor in Contempt for Lying Under Oath

Published on Jan 28, 2011 at 8:55 am in Medical Malpractice.

According to The Courier-Journal, a Jefferson Circuit Court judge has found a Louisville doctor to be in contempt for lying under oath during a deposition. Apparently, a man is in the preliminary stages of suing the doctor for medical malpractice for a November 2009 eye surgery that allegedly caused damages. The doctor reportedly lied about secretly sending two newspaper articles about the risks of pursuing trivial malpractice lawsuits to the man.

Although the assistant executive director of the Kentucky Board of Medical Licensure stated that they are investigating the doctor’s actions in court, as of now, he is in “good standing” as an ophthalmologist and eye surgeon. The doctor has been fined $7,500 and ordered to pay for the man’s legal bills in relation to the contempt litigation. While the medical malpractice case is pending, the judge said that the doctor’s false testimony may be revealed at trial. The judge also referred to the doctor’s actions as “reprehensible” and considers him to have abused the trust of the public because of sending a letter of “implied countersuit” to his former patient, then lying about it repeatedly under oath during the deposition.