Kentucky Injury Lawyers

Kindred Nursing Home Closes in Face of Violations and Fines

Published on Apr 14, 2014 at 8:33 am in Nursing Home Abuse.

Kentucky Nursing Home AbuseThe Kindred Transitional Care and Rehabilitation-Milwaukee, also known as Mount Carmel, closed its doors in early March. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that the facility announced its plans to close last fall, in the wake of an August inspection finding multiple serious violations and fines levied of $400,000.

Multiple lawsuits and citations

Kindred-Milwaukee has been cited multiple times for serious violations in recent years. In 2010, seven patients’ families filed lawsuits alleging substandard care.

The August 2013 inspection resulted in a 350-page report listing 23 federal violations. Five of those violations put residents in “immediate jeopardy,” which means the practices could cause serious injury, harm, impairment, or death. There were also three instances cited of substandard care.

In one case, paramedics had instructed a supervisor that a patient needed close monitoring and repeated reminders to keep his oxygen mask on. The supervisor did not pass those instructions on to the duty nurse. During normal rounds, he was found without his mask on, purple, and with no pulse; he died within an hour.

In another case, an alcoholic patient with chronic liver disease was able to leave and go to a local gas station to buy a vodka slushy. This patient had a history of escaping, and wasn’t being routinely monitored. On this occasion, she was only found because a maintenance worker from the facility recognized her when he stopped at the gas station.

Other problems cited included:

  • Systemic failure to correctly administer medications;
  • Failure to prevent pressure sores; and
  • Disorderly staff practices that contributed to the death of a patient.

State authorities said it is not common that inspections turn up pervasive incidents of “immediate jeopardy.” In response to the inspection findings, the facility initially announced its intention to come into compliance and to file a proposed plan of correction.

The home opened more than 30 years ago with 650 residents. It had been the state’s largest nursing home until its closure. The state is supervising the relocation of its remaining 247 residents.