Kentucky Injury Lawyers

Opioid Crisis Declared a National Public Health Emergency

Published on Nov 1, 2017 at 1:17 pm in Dangerous Drugs.

On Thursday, October 26, President Trump declared a national public health emergency over the opioid epidemic.

Trump said that over 90% of the heroin in the country comes from Mexico. He plans to combat this problem with preventing drugs from crossing the border. He believes his wall will inhibit the influx of drugs and reduce the supply and outreach so fewer people can be affected. Other people aren’t so sure that the President’s wall will fix the opioid epidemic because a lot of opioids are prescribed by doctors in the country.

These prescription uses could be the event that gets people addicted. When the prescription is done, the people still crave the drug and try to find other ways to get opioids.

The President also stated that he believes we can be the generation to end this crisis. Trump focused on another factor of the opioid issue, saying that we need to be tougher on Americans who purchase and use these drugs. “There is nothing admirable, positive, or socially desirable about it,” Trump said.

Under Trump’s direction, acting Health Secretary Eric Hargan declared a public health emergency. Under the Public Health Services Act, this declaration could get more federal agency grant money to eradicate the epidemic.

Trump’s national emergency order works through the Stafford Disaster Relieve and Emergency Assistance Act. Both of these orders have some differences. Trump’s order would use funds from the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Disaster Relief, but this is meant for natural disasters.

Hargan’s order won’t get additional funding to fight the epidemic, but it will direct federal agencies to direct more funds into this situation.

Trump envisions a tough advertising campaign to warn people to stay away from opioids. He even discussed his older brother, Fred Trump Jr., and how he watched him live a life with alcoholism.

The order under the Public Health Services Act will last 90 days. The President can renew the order at that time, until he decides that the crisis has been dealt with. The government will not use FEMA’s Disaster Relief Fund and will focus their efforts on the Public Health Emergency Fund. Even officials from the Obama administration believes this is the correct move. Now, government officials are waiting for the next part of the plan: Using the money to implement solutions that will stop the opioid crisis.

How Has the Opioid Epidemic Affected the United States?

Many people are losing their lives because of opioid addiction. These drug overdose statistics will show you how serious this situation is hurting the country:

  • 6 out of 10 overdose deaths involved an opioid.
  • 91 Americans die daily from an opioid overdose.
  • Over 500,000 people have died from drug overdose between 2000 and 2015.

If you or a loved one is suffering from an opioid addiction, Thomas Law Offices in Louisville, Kentucky might be able to help. Call today at (877) 955-7001.