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Experienced Injury Lawyers

Felony charges for nursing home workers accused of abuse

Published on Jul 8, 2015 at 9:18 am in Nursing Home Abuse.

Three medical professionals have been arraigned on felony charges of endangering the welfare of a physically disabled person and willful violation of health laws, after they were accused of dragging a bleeding and disabled patient across the floor of a nursing home in Queens, New York. Video surveillance shows the patient writhing in pain on the floor and bleeding from the head and neck for more than 20 minutes without treatment.

Nurses Funmilol Taiwo and Eshe Agbonkpolor and nurse’s aide Emmanuael Ufot were arrested this month as a result of the October 23 incident. They were all employees at the Peninsula Nursing and Rehabilitation Center where the incident occurred. The victim suffers from mental and physical disabilities and fell down near the nurse’s station, and nobody came to his immediate aid.

Frankfort Caregivers Charged with Sexual Abuse of Intellectually Disabled

Published on Jun 11, 2015 at 3:22 pm in Nursing Home Abuse.

Four caregivers have been indicted for their role in a sex abuse scandal at Community Choices Unlimited. Attorney General Jack Conway and his Medicaid Fraud and Abuse Control Unit announced the indictment after the foursome failed to report the abuse allegedly committed by Damon Heath. As a result of their negligence, Heath was able to continue his abuse of Community Choices residents.

Nursing Home Patients Often Dehydrated

Published on Feb 25, 2015 at 7:23 pm in Nursing Home Abuse.

A new study has found that in the UK, nursing home patients suffer from dehydration more often than their elderly counterparts not living in care homes. Experts say the problem is also present in the U.S. and Canada, as well as other European countries.

The U.K. study looked at dehydration rates for patients as they were admitted to hospitals; the data showed that those admitted directly from nursing homes were more commonly dehydrated. Dehydration can lead to dangerously high sodium levels, which can increase the risk of dying while in the hospital.

The findings were reported in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. The study looked at patients 65 and older who were admitted to the hospital over two-year period. Of 21,000 patients, 432 were admitted with high sodium levels and 1400 died in the hospital. Patients admitted from nursing homes were more than five times as likely to have high sodium levels than those admitted from their own homes. Dehydrated patients – admitted from any setting – were five times more likely to die in the hospital.

Extendicare Fined $38 Million For Poor Care And Overbilling

Published on Jan 9, 2015 at 8:00 am in Nursing Home Abuse.

Extendicare has settled federal government charges against the company for improper billing and poor care for $38 million. The Justice Department reported that this is the largest nursing home chain settlement for providing substandard care in the department’s history. Both problems were brought to light from whistleblower lawsuits.

Extendicare is a Canadian company, but it’s the seventh largest nursing home operator in the U.S.; it owns 150 nursing homes in 11 states. The New York Times reports that among the charges brought were:

• A failure to hire enough nurses to provide care needed in 33 of its homes

• This failure lead to “pervasive problems” including serious falls, head injuries and bed sores that could have been prevented

• Patients were malnourished and dehydrated, and some developed preventable infections that led to hospitalizations.

The Justice Department has made it clear that none of these events are accidental or due to negligent oversight. Rather, the department went on record accusing Extendicare of deliberately seeking profits at the expense of patient care. Joyce R. Branda, an acting assistant attorney general, said “These problems stemmed in large part from Extendicare’s business model — a model that was driven more by profit and less by the quality of care it provided.”

Nursing Home Staff Levels Are Lower Than Reported

Published on Nov 28, 2014 at 2:54 pm in Nursing Home Abuse.

We’ve reported earlier on this blog about flaws with the federal government’s reliance on nursing homes to self-report their staffing levels. This system has lead to homes padding payrolls, adding temporary staff right around inspection time only to lay them off soon after.

Now the Center for Public Integrity has done its own auditing and found that thousands of nursing homes have inflated their staff levels to the Nursing Home Compare website run by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

The levels shown on the Nursing Home Compare website were higher than the staff levels the Center for Public Integrity found by looking at annual financial reports submitted by the homes. Those documents contain revenue and expenditure data, along with resident population, which allow a precise calculation of staff to resident ratios.