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Kentucky Injury Lawyers

How to Protect Yourself from Hospital Errors

Published on Jun 4, 2014 at 8:27 am in Medical Malpractice.

In an earlier blog, I reviewed a Consumer Reports article highlighting the continued problem of patient safety in U.S. hospitals. New data shows that up to 440,000 patients die each year after suffering a medical error in a hospital.

How can you protect yourself the next time you’re admitted to a hospital? AARP lists some tips on keeping safe in hospitals on its web site. Their recommendations include:

  • Get to know your nurses and aides – Anyone who has stayed overnight at a hospital knows that in-between the brief moments that doctors make their rounds, it’s the nurses and aides that are in charge of your care. Nurses coordinate your daily care plan and can be your ally if you communicate with them about your concerns and needs. The aides address many of your personal-care needs and can be key to helping you stay comfortable.

Patient Harm in Hospitals Third Leading Cause of Death

Published on May 27, 2014 at 2:03 pm in Medical Malpractice.

Kentucky Medical MalpracticeA recent Consumer Reports article highlights the continued problem of patient safety in U.S. hospitals. The Journal of Patient Safety, a peer-reviewed medical journal, published a recent study that found that 440,000 patients die each year after suffering a medical error in a hospital.

The study was spearheaded by a scientist whose own son died at the age of 19 after cardiologists at two different hospitals made a series of mistakes. Put in alarming terms: this number of fatalities makes patient harm in hospitals the third leading cause of death, after heart disease and cancer.

Medicare Makes First-Time Release of Spending

Published on May 9, 2014 at 8:40 am in Medical Malpractice.

Kentucky Medical MalpracticeIn what The New York Times is calling the “most detailed data ever released in Medicare’s nearly 50-year history,” the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have made public the details of the $77 billion that Medicare paid out to doctors in 2012. The monies cover services to the elderly and disabled, paid out by Medicare and Medicaid Services.

For decades, the American Medical Association and other groups have blocked the release of this data. They claimed it was for privacy concerns and the potential misuse of the information. However, a federal judge last year ruled against their objections and ordered that the information could be made public.

Hospital Stay Leads to Infection for One in 25

Published on Apr 28, 2014 at 8:17 am in Medical Malpractice.

Kentucky Hospital LitigationAccording to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one in 25 patients will develop an infection while staying in a U.S. hospital. A report published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that more than 600,000 patients each year contracted infections and that more than 10% die from the infection.

While this sounds alarming, especially since these infections are preventable, USA Today reports that the infection rate appears to be going down. The current study analyzed 2011 data from 183 hospitals in 10 states, and showed a reduction from the last estimate conducted in 2007. The two studies used different methods, so they can’t be directly compared but the CDC believes does it reflect a real reduction due to concerted efforts.

Hospital Errors are the Third Leading Cause of Death in the U.S., Says Study

Published on Oct 14, 2013 at 8:01 am in Medical Malpractice.

A new study suggests that U.S. hospitals have a serious problem with medical staff making serious and preventable errors.

This fall, an article in The Journal of Patient Safety estimated that “the true number of premature deaths associated with preventable harm to patients was estimated at more than 400,000 per year.”

This new study makes a strong case that previous estimates of this problem were mistakenly low. An earlier study had pegged the number at 98,000, but the new research presents compelling evidence that the prior study used inaccurate research methods.