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Study Finds Sixty Percent of Children’s Car Seats Contain Toxic Chemicals

Published on Aug 16, 2011 at 12:42 pm in Child Injury.

A recent study found that about sixty percent of children’s car seats contain at least one toxic chemical. The study was conducted by the nonprofit environmental organization the Ecology Center and was published on the consumer site HealthyStuff.org.

Over 150 children’s car seats from model year 2011 were tested in the study. Specifically, the seats were tested for lead, chlorine, and bromine, as well as other allergens and heavy metals. Bromine is associated with flame retardants, and chlorine may indicate the presence of plasticizers, PVC, or polyvinyl chloride. All of these substances may be linked to such risks as liver toxicity, impaired learning, cancer, birth defects, allergies, and more. The breakdown of these chemicals can be accelerated by UV-ray exposure and heat, which may also increase their toxicity. In particular, babies are at-risk in relation of exposure, since their bodies are still developing and they spend a significant amount of hours in car seats.
The study found that the most toxic car seats from 2011 model years were as follows: