fbpx
Experienced Injury Lawyers
During the COVID-19 Pandemic, we're offering Free Virtual Consultations

Graco to Recall Toddler and Booster Seats

Published on Feb 26, 2014 at 8:32 am in Child Injury.

Kentucky Child InjuryGraco has announced a voluntary recall affecting toddler and booster seats for model years 2009 – 2013. Infant seats are not affected. The recall covers 11 car seat models (listed below), which encompasses 3.7 million units.

At issue is the red release button on the harness, which becomes stuck from food and dried liquids. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has received at least 80 complaints about the seats from parents who sometimes had to resort to cutting children out of the seats. No injuries have yet been reported from the harnesses being stuck, but the NHTSA warns it could be a safety hazard in the case of fire or other emergency.

Car Safety for Kids: Side-Impact Tests Coming for Car Seats and New Data Confirms Buckling Saves Children’s Lives

Published on Feb 19, 2014 at 8:09 am in Child Injury.

In recent car seat news, side-impact crash testing may soon be required. In addition, national data shows that for fatalities involving children 12 and younger, one in three weren’t buckled up.

Side-Impact Testing Proposed for Car Seats

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has proposed a new rule requiring manufacturers to test car seats for safety from side impact in crashes. Consumer advocates point out that this is similar to the protection required for adults.

The test would require use of dummies simulating a one year-old infant and a three year-old. The goal is that the seats should prevent harmful head contact if a side door comes into the car, and the seats should reduce crash forces absorbed by the head and chest. The protections would be required for children up to 40 pounds.

Install Your Baby’s Car Seat Properly

Published on Oct 30, 2013 at 8:44 am in Child Injury.

As if new parents don’t have enough to worry about, figuring out how to install the car seat is just another thing on the list. But after you’ve taken the time to find the right car seat for your baby, don’t neglect this important step.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reports that three out of four car seats are not properly installed. Car seats can greatly reduce risk of injury or death, but only if used as designed.

Among the top mistakes made with infant car seats are a bad fit on the harness and loose installation.

Infant CPR Classes in Kentucky Teach Valuable First Aid Tips

Published on Oct 23, 2013 at 8:50 am in Child Injury.

Kentucky Personal InjuryIf you’ve seen listings for infant CPR courses in your area, consider signing up for one today. You may think it sounds far-fetched, but accidents can and do happen. Infants can stop breathing and become unconscious from choking on food or toys, accidental drowning, and getting tangled up in cords. In fact, Parents.com reports that unintentional choking and suffocation are the leading causes of all injury deaths for infants younger than 12 months.

In a half-day infant CPR class, you will learn infant-specific CPR techniques, choking rescue, when to call 911, and essential first aid skills. While you can read about some of these skills online, the benefit of a class is that they will have life-like dolls for you to practice on directly.

Baby-Proofing Your Kentucky Home

Published on Oct 2, 2013 at 8:39 am in Child Injury.

A baby’s first six months of life may bring sleepless nights for new parents, but at least during this period babies aren’t very mobile. You can leave babies in the middle of the living room floor and know they’ll stay in the area. After eight months, most babies are crawling and exploring the house, and you’ll be surprised at how fast they can move and how clever they are.

Hazards lurk in many areas of your home, so take some time before your baby is mobile to start securing dangerous spots.

Stairs and Windows

An alarming number of injuries occur from falls on stairs or out windows. Be sure to install sliding gates at both ends of stairs. Inspect your window openings for child access. Consider installing window guards, or using window stops so that sliding windows can’t open more than a few inches.