Have You Been Injured? We're Ready to Fight for You.

What Should I Give the Insurance Adjuster if I’ve Been in an Accident?

Published on Aug 2, 2019 at 1:17 pm in Car Accidents.
The Law Office of Mike Campbell has joined forces with Thomas Law Offices as of September 1st, 2020. Click here for details.

Short answer: Nothing! If you are negotiating your personal injury case on your own with the at-fault party’s insurance adjuster, then you’ve probably dealt with a few things. First, insurance companies regularly switch adjusters on injured people, making it even more confusing to know who to call and how to get a hold of the adjuster. Second, some adjusters can try and convince injured people that their case is not worth that much. They tell an injured person that the company is only permitting the adjuster to offer a certain amount.

What they don’t tell the injured person is that they (the adjusters) are evaluated based on whether or not they were able to resolve the injury case below the true value of the case. Also, insurance adjusters tell injured people that they need certain things to “investigate the case” such as written statements and other documents as explained below.

Verbal/Written Statements: A very friendly insurance adjuster calls you and says she understands that you were injured in a car accident with their insured. First, though, they just need to get your side of the story before they pay you and close the file. The problem is that they adjusters are typically looking for ways to deny your claim or convince you that you were somehow at fault for the accident. In case after case, we have seen where adjusters will take a written or verbal statement from a client and then claim the client was 10%-15% at fault for the wreck because of something the client said. Don’t believe that nonsense! And more importantly, don’t give a verbal or written statement!

HIPAA Records: The insurance adjuster tells you that she really wants to compensate you for your injuries, but she just needs to review some of your medical records before her boss will let her send you a check. Oh, and she’s going to need your records from ten to fifteen years before the wreck from every provider you’ve seen. This is an outrageous invasion of your privacy and you should reject this request! Besides having no real relevance to your case, these records go into an insurance database and can be shared with other parties. Just say “no” to this request as well.

Tax Records:  You are injured in a car accident and are unable to work. You tell the insurance adjuster you’ve lost thousands of dollars in wages, and she should know that you’ve had to stay home because she’s constantly calling you about settling your case. She tells you that she wants to help you with your lost wages, but she needs to review your tax returns first. She’s going to need this past year’s returns and five years of previous returns. This is absolutely crazy and you should reject this request. Your lost wages can be documented through pay stubs, employer statements, or redacted tax records, rather than allowing an insurance company to get its hands on your full tax returns.

The above are just a few examples of what adjusters ask for in a personal injury case. In your case, they may ask for more documents. However, it’s very rare that an adjuster needs to sees all of the information they ask for in order to fully evaluate your claim. Instead, what they are doing is finding ways not to pay you by pointing out discrepancies in your statements, your records, and your tax returns. If an adjustor is asking you for documents or statements, call an attorney immediately. If you want a free consult with our office about what your rights are and what options you have, don’t hesitate to call.

Meet Your Team

Tad Thomas - Trial Lawyer

Tad Thomas

Managing Partner

Tad Thomas has dedicated his practice to representing plaintiffs in various types of civil litigation, including personal injury, business litigation, class actions, and multi-district litigation.

After graduating with his law degree in 2000 from Salmon P. Chase College of Law at Northern Kentucky University, Mr. Thomas immediately opened his own private practice and began representing injury victims.

In 2011, Thomas Law Offices was established in Louisville, Kentucky. Over the past decade, Mr. Thomas has expanded his firm and now has offices in three additional locations: Cincinnati, Ohio, Columbia, Missouri, and Chicago, Illinois. He is also a frequent lecturer on topics like trial skills and ethics and technology.

Free Case Evaluation

At Thomas Law Offices, our personal injury attorneys recognize that our potential clients are likely going through some of the most difficult times of their lives. We don't want you to have to worry about paying out-of-pocket for legal advice when you're just starting to learn your legal rights and options. That's why we provide free case evaluations. We'll offer our expert advice about your potential case and walk you through how we can help you.

Call us or fill out the form below to tell us about your potential case and a personal injury lawyer will get back to you as quickly as possible.

Legal & Firm News

What You Need to Know About Business Litigation and Contingency Fees

If your business has ever been involved in a legal matter, you may be surprised to hear the two phrases together: business litigation and contingency fees. Traditionally, it has been more common to associate a contingency fee model with personal injury law involving individual parties rather than businesses. But this is no longer always the […]

Read More

Signs of PTSD in Military Service Members

It’s estimated that up to one-third of military service members suffer from PTSD. PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder, is a mental health condition that can develop following a traumatic event. This usually means an event involving actual or threatened death, serious injury, or abuse. People who have seen combat, witnessed death, or experienced a life-threatening situation […]

Read More

AAA Conducts Study Examining Travel Before and During COVID-19

In 2021, new research from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety’s New American Driving Survey revealed shifts in driving, traveling, and commuting patterns in the United States. The statistics gathered between July 2019 and December 2020 cannot be analyzed without consideration of COVID-19’s unignorable impact on the numbers—numbers showing marked differences from previous years’ findings.

Read More